Manufacturing data in the U.S. dragged Wall Street

Stocks on Wall Street fell slightly, but remained at its highest level since 2010. This happens because there are signs of economic weakness, the shadow market.

The S & P 500 is up 5.9 percent over the past three months as the Federal Reserve is ready to inject liquidity into the market, and stimulate their economies. This move has lifted the index 17 percent this year, and pushed the S & P to its best level in five years.

However, data businesses in the United States (U.S.) a disappointing showing contraction for the first time since 2009. More news to come from a weak manufacturing report and a sharp drop in U.S. durable goods orders last month.

The Dow Jones industrial average (DJI) fell 48.84 points, or 0.36 percent, to 13437.13. Index The Standard & Poor’s 500 (SPX) fell 6.48 points, or 0.45 percent, to 1440.67, and the Nasdaq Composite Index (IXIC) dropped 20.37 points, or 0.65 percent, to 3116.23.

But, in the third quarter, the Dow recorded an increase of 4.3 percent and the Nasdaq rose 6.2 percent. For September alone, the Dow rose 2.6 percent and the S & P 500 rose 2.4 percent, while the Nasdaq rose 1.6 percent.

The technology sector recorded the biggest gain in the S & P (PTSD), such as Accenture PLC (ACN.N) rose 7.1 percent to USD70, 03. After Accenture profit recorded values ​​higher than analysts expected.

Trading volume was light observed with approximately 6.15 billion shares changed hands on the New York Stock Exchange, Amex and Nasdaq, compared with a daily average volume of 6.38 billion. Decliners outnumbered advancers on the NYSE by a ratio of 3:2, while on the Nasdaq, about two stocks fell for every one that rose.